fbpx
Book now
Request a brochure

Contact Us

4th Floor Nova South
160 Victoria Street
London
SW1E 5LB info@bucksmore.com +44 (0) 794 642 4965

Live chat

Contact Us

4th Floor Nova South
160 Victoria Street
London
SW1E 5LB info@bucksmore.com +44 (0) 794 642 4965

Live chat

Get in Touch

  • This form collects information we will use to send you updates about promotions, special offers, and news. We will not share or sell your personal information. You can unsubscribe at any time. For more information please refer to our Privacy Policy.
Request a brochure

Saved Courses

article | 15 March 2019

10 Tips and Tricks to Learn Any Language

We know what you’re thinking. Learning a new language from scratch is challenging and is near impossible if it does not have some forms of similarities with the language(s) you already speak. Lucky enough that you speak one of them, right? Well, hear us out, learning a new language does not have to be a difficult or daunting experience. There are plenty of help books, websites, podcasts and programmes that are great tools to help you in your quest. We have compiled 10 tips and tricks that we hope will also come in handy:

  1. Pronunciation: This may not seem like the most obvious, but when learning a new language, practising the pronunciation of words, especially the ones you find most complicated, will help your mouth muscles to move in ways it has not been accustomed to before; hence helping in memorising phrases.
  2. Accents: Most of us learning a new language will sometimes find it hard to understand accents, especially if the native speaker is a fast talker. But the more you try sounding like a native speaker, the better you can trick your brain into learning the language the way a native speaks it. This comes in handy, as native speakers can communicate easily with you and in turn you gain confidence, which can be a great booster when learning a new language.
  3. Sounds: The method of minimal pair training will help you differentiate those pesky words like sheep and ship. It is basically just listening to the word you find challenging over and over again, and repeat it as many times as you can so as to train your brain in finally learning the difference between the two different pronunciations.
  4. Flashcards: One of the oldest and surest ways, involves writing words next to a picture, with your translation on the other side. You can then keep checking back to see if you have guessed the word right. There are quite a few apps these days that make it very easy to either create, store or choose existing flashcards right there on your mobile.
  5. The Natural Way: The brain is amazing in the fact that it’s constantly analysing sounds and words that it hears to anticipate what could be coming next. Which means that immersing yourself into the language, either by listening to it for long periods of time, or reading a book, will help your brain process the new language in a context.
  6. Grammar: Slightly more controversial, as not everyone agrees with this system, but knowing the grammar of the language you are learning can be helpful. But this is how: only when you are confident enough with the basics of the language should you move on with the intricacies of grammar as you could easily overload yourself and get discouraged.
  7. Time: This may seem fairly obvious, but is really is imperative that you actually have the time to learn a new language. The more hours in a day you possess, the better. If you give yourself the time, you will learn at a comfortable pace and the investment of your time will surely pay off in results like motivation and of course being able to speak the language!
  8. Study buddy: Finding yourself a study partner may be one of the best ways yet to learn a new language. Because humans are social, working as a team helps people accomplish better things faster. Plus you get access to a support network that can provide you with encouragement and advice.
  9. Activities: Find things to do that you actually love doing – but try to do it either in a group, or the country of the language you are projecting to learn. This qualifies as immersion, but you are simply mixing an activity you love with a task, and this can make it more enjoyable, not to mention that you are learning how to say the things you love doing in a brand new language!
  10. Talk to yourself: Last but not least, yes you can learn a new language while you talk to yourself, but in your target language! You may seem like a crazy person, but talking to yourself will allow you to think in the new language and also catch errors and correct yourself. This will also keep words and phrases fresh in your mind and help with memorising them for the future.

Here at Bucksmore Education, we have a range of English language courses for students aged 10-18 that introduce them to a communicative style of language learning and provide grammar and vocabulary tuition tailored to each student’s ability. Our experienced and qualified teachers take an innovative approach to language learning that students are unlikely to have encountered in their schools’ classroom. We prioritise interactive learning, discussion and debate amongst their peers, creating an immersive language learning experience both inside and outside the classroom. So whether you’re looking for a intensive English language course like our Bucksmore Summer programme or you’re also looking to learn a new skill with our Arts Experience programme there is certainly something for everyone.

For more information on each of our courses and prestigious locations take a browse around our website or contact one of our Course Consultants at info@bucksmore.com or on +44 (0) 208 312 8060.